EU referendum: Brexit wins as Britain votes to leave European Union

By Michael Wilkinson

Britain has voted to leave the European Union, with the Leave campaign securing around 51.8 per cent of the vote.

David Cameron, who will address the nation shortly, is now facing calls to resign as Prime Minister.

While England voted overwhelmingly for Brexit, Scotland and Northern Ireland backed Remain. Statements are expected to be made by Sinn Fein and the SNP later today calling for a breakaway from the Union. London backed Remain but the turnout was lower than expected because of bad weather.

The pound crashed to the lowest level since 1985 as sterling fell below $1.35. Complacency about a Brexit outcome will come clear this morning, as out of hours trading suggests that the FTSE 100 will drop by 8.8pc, or by some 560 points. The fall would be the third worst in history if stocks ended the day down as sharply.

FINAL RESULT

48.1%
51.9%
Counting progress 100%
Last updated 07:30Midpoint

Farage: The sun has risen on an independent UK

Ukip leader Nigel Farage calls for a Brexit government immediately to start negotiating UK’s new place in the world.

Corbyn calls for Government to start EU withdrawal immediately

Jeremy Corbyn has provoked a furious backlash from Labour MPs after calling on the Government to immediately start the process of withdrawing from the European Union.

The Labour leader said that Article 50 needs to be “invoked now” in response to the EU referendum result because “many communities are fed up with cuts and economic dislocation.

Labour MPs, who repeatedly warned that Mr Corbyn was failing to do enough during the referendum campaign, said he was “absolutely crazy”.

It comes after a leaked Labour script claimed that Jeremy Corbyn is “uniquely placed as a critical Remainer” to help unify Britain in the wake of the referendum.

Corbyn calls for Government to start EU withdrawal immediately

Jeremy Corbyn has provoked a furious backlash from Labour MPs after calling on the Government to immediately start the process of withdrawing from the European Union.

The Labour leader said that Article 50 needs to be “invoked now” in response to the EU referendum result because “many communities are fed up with cuts and economic dislocation.

Labour MPs, who repeatedly warned that Mr Corbyn was failing to do enough during the referendum campaign, said he was “absolutely crazy”.

It comes after a leaked Labour script claimed that Jeremy Corbyn is “uniquely placed as a critical Remainer” to help unify Britain in the wake of the referendum.

His comments led to accusations that he is “delusional” and led to open calls for him to quit.

Mr Corbyn said: “Article 50 needs to be invoked now. Many communities are fed up with cuts and very angry. The message is that many communities are fed up with cuts and economic dislocation. Clearly there are very difficult days ahead. There will be job consequences.”

Steven Swinford, deputy political editor

A divided nation

This map shows the stark divisions between Scotland, Northern Ireland and London, which were pro-EU and the rest of England and Wales which were pro-Brexit.

The result now raises very serious questions about the future of the Union

Corbyn: ‘Very difficult days ahead’

Jeremy Corbyn has stopped short of calling for David Cameron to resign but said that “the Prime Minister has some very urgent tasks ahead of him”.

In an interview with the BBC’s David Dimbleby, he warned: “There are some very difficult days ahead. There will be job consequences because of this decision.”

He added: “People are fed up with the cuts they have had and feel very angry about the way they have been marginalised by successive governments.

“Obviously there has to be a strategy but the whole point is that the public were asked to give an opinion, they gave an opinion and parliament must act upon that.”

France: ‘Europe continues but must rediscover confidence of the people’

Laurence Fabius, the French Foreign minister, says: “I am sad for the United Kingdom. Europe continues, but she must react and rediscover the confidence of the people. It is urgent.”

Charles Michel, the Belgian prime minister, calls for a summit to relaunch the EU.

“I call for a conclave to reaffirm our commitment in July. We have to define our priorities and set out a new future for Europe.”

Final voting tally announced

The final results have just been announced at Manchester Town Hall.

There were 33,577,342 votes cast with Remain securing 16,141,241 votes and Leave 17,410,742.

How the South East and South West voted

 

Could Northern Ireland break away?

Sinn Fein says “British government has forfeited any mandate to represent economic or political interests of people in N Ireland”

The media wait on Boris Johnson

The Media outside Boris Johnson's house
The Media outside Boris Johnson’s house

This is the scene outside Boris Johnson’s house this morning.

‘Corbyn must go’

A Labour MP tells the Telegraph this morning: “Corbyn has to go. The referendum proved he is worse than even his worse critics said he would be. Even people who supported him have seen he is not up to it. He can’t motivate Labour voters, let alone persuade anyone else. He can’t handle a campaign or even manage to get a message across in an interview.

Jeremy Corsby is under pressure to quit
Jeremy Corsby is under pressure to quit

“But it is not just that he is incompetent and not up to the job: he has no ideas beyond the vacuous slogans he repeats. He hasn’t set out a single serious policy since he became leader and the views he does have – like on immigration and free movement – are diametrically opposed to the public’s.

Gibraltar’s fears for the future

The Gibraltar Chronicle reports that the British territory voted overwhelmingly to remain in the EU, with Gibraltarians fearing that Brexit will antagonise already testy relations with Spain.

“Gibraltar voted by 19,322 votes to 823 to stay in the EU, meaning 96% of the electorate chose Remain,” the newspaper says this morning.

The rock of Gibralter?Photo: Paul grover for the telegraph
The rock of Gibralter?Photo: Paul grover for the telegraph

Turnout was high at 84 per cent.

Chief Minister Fabian Picardo said: “This result demonstrates that the will of the people of Gibraltar is overwhelming to remain a part of the European Union. Gibraltar and the Gibraltarians, perhaps more so than many others have ‘skin in the game’ of staying a part of Europe. Europe matters to us and we demonstrate that tonight.”

So the overall vote to leave the EU will come as a bitter blow to the British territory.

Final results come in

The final results have come in and the nation voted 52% for leave, 48% for remain.

Schulz: EU must fight to avoid chain reaction

Martin Schulz, the president of the European Parliament, said he would speak with German Chancellor Angela Merkel “on how we can avoid a chain reaction” of other EU states following.

“The chain reaction that is being celebrated everywhere now by euroskeptics won’t happen,” he said.

President of the European parliament Martin Schulz , left, and President of the European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker, right
President of the European parliament Martin Schulz , left, and President of the European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker, right Credit: AP

The EU was the biggest single market in the world and “Great Britain has just cut its ties with that market,” Schulz said.

“That’ll have consequences and I don’t believe other countries will be encouraged to follow that dangerous path.”

“I am not shocked,” he said of the results of the British referendum, adding: “We were prepared.”

Matthew Holehouse, Brussels Correspondent

Farage: I can’t guarantee EU money will go on the NHS

Nigel Farage says it was a mistake for Vote Leave to say the UK would be able to spend £350m on the NHS after a Brexit.

Jeremy Corbyn pictured leaving his home

The Labour leader has been pictured leaving his Islington home this morning.

Jeremy Corbyn
Jeremy Corbyn Credit: Getty Images

‘Huge disconnect’ between Labour and voters

Labour MP Kate Hoey, the Leave campaigner, cast further doubt over the futures of both David Cameron and George Osborne, but admitted the result also exposed a “huge disconnect” in her party.

“I certainly do not want to see David Cameron leading the negotiations,” she told the Radio 4’s Today progamme. “We have to get someone who is genuinely committed to getting out.”

She added: “At the moment George Osborne should be heavily criticised for the way he has handled this, the way he has scared the markets as we have seen today.

“But that will pass. Whether he will see that pass, I’m not so sure.”

Ms Hoey admitted the election exposed a “huge disconnect” between her party’s leadership and areas outside London.

“Some of us in Labour Leave have always said this would happen for some time….There is this huge disconnect in Labour areas certainly further out of London from the Labour leadership.

“All this discussion about what’s happening with the Conservatives, there’s also a big discussion about how we are going to win people back.”

She added: “I think the Labour Party should have had a clearer view that they were quite happy for people to be campaigning on both sides and I’m disappointed Jeremy did not take that view. He was under huge pressure from his shadow cabinet.”

Tom Morgan

UK is likely to lose its AAA credit rating

The chief ratings officer for credit agency Standard and Poor’s says the UK is likely to lose its AAA credit rating.

Moritz Kraemer told the Financial Times: “We think that a AAA-rating is untenable under the circumstances.”

Bank of England issues statement

“The Bank of England is monitoring developments closely. It has undertaken extensive contingency planning and is working closely with HM Treasury, other domestic authorities and overseas central banks. The Bank of England will take all necessary steps to meet its responsibilities for monetary and financial stability.”

‘Anti-EU contagion will spread’

La Stampa newspaper says there is now a profound risk of anti-EU contagion, with anti-Brussels sentiments spreading around the continent.

A recent poll found that 48 per cent of Italians would leave the EU if given the chance to vote in their own referendum.

“The United Kingdom has spoken. And its voice is being heard by the whole world,” the daily says in an analysis piece this morning.

Nick Squires, Rome Correspondent

Russia predicts break-up of UK

Roland Oliphant, our Moscow Correspondent, reports on the reaction from Russia.

Much has been made of the Kremlin’s supposed interest in Brexit, and now that it is happening some commentators here are pre-emptively pushing back at an anticipation blame being directed at Moscow.

“It looks like Britain is quitting the EU. Will they play the song “It’s all Putin’s fault?” Or will they analyse the problems of the EU this time?” tweeted Vladimir Soloviev, a popular television presenter who is generally considered loyal to the Kremlin line.

Meanwhile, media have focussed on the further breakup of Britain and even the EU and the growth of far right nationalism across the continent.

“British media are certain: at this rate the UK will leave the EU, but that could threaten the break up of the country itself,” reported Russia’s Vesti state television channel.

Brendan Cox speaks out on EU referendum result

The husband of murdered Labour MP Jo Cox has tweeted this about the EU referendum.

This is how the Eastern area voted

This is how London voted

‘EU must eat some humble pie’

Nigel Evans MP told the Telegraph in Manchester he believes David Cameron should stay on as Prime Minister and that European leaders will need to eat some “humble pie.”

He said: “If it wasn’t for David Cameron we wouldn’t of had this referendum. So thank you David. We on the Leave side have as much faith in this country as he did at the beginning of the campaign. I hope he will stay on as Prime Minister and just focus on what we need to do to quietly dismantle the machinery of the European Union so we can act as an independent country.

Nigel Evans MP
Nigel Evans MP Credit: Reuters

“I don’t think he’ll need to go back and eat humble pie, the people who do need to eat humble pie are President Tusk, President Junker and Angela Merkel and a few of the others who weren’t prepared to offer Great Britain what the really needed.

“If I was them I would start to worry about what they need to do to keep Denmark, Holland and a number of other countries on board.”

Germany: ‘No special treatment for Britain’

Manfred Weber, a senior German conservative MEP and a close ally of Angela Merkel, has warned Britain will receive “no special treatment” and must leave the EU within two years.

He writes in four tweets: “We respect and regret the decision of the British voters. It causes major damage to both sides.

Manfred Weber, a senior German conservative MEP and a close ally of Angela Merkel
Manfred Weber, a senior German conservative MEP and a close ally of Angela Merkel Credit: EPA

“This was a British vote, not a European vote. Co-operation within Europe is a question of self-assertion of the continent.

“We want a better and smarter Europe. We have to convince the people and bring Europe back to them.

“Exit negotiations should be concluded within two years at max. There cannot be any special treatment. Leave means leave.”

For more of this story visit – http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/06/24/eu-referendum-results-live-brexit-wins-as-britain-votes-to-leave/
Source: The Telegraph

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