Watchdog Says ‘Pervasive’ Digital Sex Crime Affecting Life For S.Korean Women, Girls

By Josh Smith

 Digital sex crime is now so pervasive in South Korea that the fear of it is affecting the quality of life for women and girls, with many victims saying they had considered suicide or leaving the country, a human rights watchdog said on Wednesday.

South Korea has become the global epicentre of spycam – the use of tiny, hidden cameras to film victims naked, urinating or having sex.

Other cases have involved intimate photos being leaked without permission, or sex abuse such as rapes captured on camera and the videos shared online.

Victims are often traumatized further and become “immersed in the abuse” by encounters with police and other justice officials, and by the expectation that they should gather evidence and monitor the internet for new appearances of images of themselves, U.S.-based Human Rights Watch (HRW) said in a report.

“Digital sex crimes have become so common, and so feared, in South Korea that they are affecting the quality of life of all women and girls,” Heather Barr, the report’s author, said in a statement.

“Women and girls told us they avoided using public toilets and felt anxious about hidden cameras in public and even in their homes. An alarming number of survivors of digital sex crimes said they had considered suicide.”

Source: news.trust.org

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