SEWODA To Provide Skills Training For Women In Liberia

By Jallah Amoson

The national coordinator of the Southeastern Women Development Association (SEWODA) of Harper City, Maryland County, Helena Torh Turo, says her organization will work along with local partners and others to transform women of the region through skills development to make them more productive in their families and country.

She told reporters that her organization, with over 1,000 members, works to improve the living conditions of people, especially women and children, through advocacy, education, agriculture, peace-building, community development, and health-related programs.

“We engage our fellow women in the community in an interactive manner so we discuss and provide answers to their concerns and also make recommendations that can use to improve their situation,” she said.

UNMIL Photo/Christophe Herwig - Ganta, Liberia, July 30, 2008 :  The Ganta Concerned Women’s Group has organized a pilot project to teach women in Tonglewin village how to read and do basic mathematics.  Liberia’s electricity system was destroyed in the war, and power has not yet been restored. Classes are conducted in semi-darkness twice a week.

Madam Turo said SEWODA gives advisory services on improved methods of agriculture to rural communities and facilitates the preparation of seeds, and multiplication processes for backyard gardens for women.

She said a tools-bank has been set up in each of the five southeastern counties (Maryland, Grand Gedeh, Grand Kru, Sinoe, and River Gee) to provide access to farming implements and seedlings to SEWODA members.

 Madam Turo said the organization has also created agricultural demonstration sites to assist rural women with basic skills and techniques to be more productive on their farms.
She said despite the economic crisis facing the country, Liberian women should remain focused on things that will benefit the nation and its people.

Turo described the establishment of vocational institutions in the country as one of the major ways forward for Liberia’s growth, and meanwhile urged Liberians to turn to the soil to revamp the agriculture sector.

The organization was founded 1996 with a membership of 100 women. SEWODA has been concerned about the need for improved farm to market roads in the leeward counties to ensure food is transported to the various markets and communities for sale and consumption.


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